Certain COVID-19 emergency declaration blanket waivers are being phased out by the federal government, and health care providers should take steps to determine whether current arrangements are compliant. As background, in response to the COVID-19 public health emergency CMS previously enacted extensive temporary COVID-19 Emergency Declaration Blanket Waivers for Health Care Providers. However, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have now determined that various regulatory requirements must be restored in order to protect the health and safety of residents in long-term care facilities.

Continue Reading NOTICE TO PROVIDERS: CMS Phasing Out Certain COVID-19 Regulatory Waivers in Long-Term Care Facilities, Hospices, and ESRD Facilities

On March 24th, 2022, the Advanced Medical Technology Association’s (AdvaMed) Board of Directors approved updates to the AdvaMed Code of Ethics (Code), which provides guidance to the health care industry on interactions between medical technology companies and health care professionals (HCPs). The revised Code goes into effect on June 1, 2022.

Continue Reading AdvaMed Updates its Code of Ethics

On March 16, 2022, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) published Advisory Opinion 22-05 (Advisory Opinion) in which it declined to impose sanctions against a medical device manufacturer (Requestor) that proposes to pay certain cost-sharing obligations of clinical trial participants, including Medicare beneficiaries. The OIG concluded that although the proposed arrangement (described below) would constitute prohibited remuneration under the Federal anti-kickback statute (AKS) and the beneficiary inducement prohibitions of the Civil Monetary Penalties Law (CMP), the low-risk nature of the proposed arrangement did not warrant the imposition of sanctions.

Continue Reading Advisory Opinion 22-05: OIG Declines to Impose Sanctions Against Device Manufacturer’s Medicare Cost-Sharing Subsidy in Clinical Trial

On Monday, November 15, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) repealed a policy established by the Trump administration that directed the FDA not to enforce premarket review requirements for COVID-19 laboratory developed tests (LDTs). This prior policy, which waived premarket review requirements aimed at increasing broad public access to COVID-19 tests, was generally consistent with the FDA’s historical stance allowing laboratories to not seek approval of LDTs. With the policy announced by the Trump administration, laboratories again began offering their tests prior to or without an emergency use authorization (EUA) after the test was validated and a notification was provided to the FDA. While this policy expedited the availability of tests, the FDA contends that the policy also led to some poorly-performing tests being offered prior to FDA review. Notably, this prior policy did not apply to at-home or point of care collection tests, which have always required FDA review.
Continue Reading HHS Again Requires FDA Premarket Review for COVID-19 Tests

Below is an excerpt of an article co-authored with the Robinson+Cole Construction Law Group and published in Healthcare Facilities Today on March 31, 2021. 

The need to update and implement new processes for delivering healthcare in response to the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the adoption of more automation, remote access and monitoring technologies. It

On November 2, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized its 2021 End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System Rule. Among other things, the final rule expands Medicare payments for in-home dialysis equipment and supplies as part of an effort to encourage in-home care for populations vulnerable to COVID-19. We previously wrote about the proposed rule here.
Continue Reading CMS Finalizes 2021 End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System Rule Expanding Payments for In-Home Dialysis Equipment and Supplies

On March 27, Congress enacted the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act, or the Act), Public Law 116-136, a trillion-dollar stimulus bill intended to provide financial assistance to individuals and business affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.  The Act contains a broad range of measures intended to bolster the economy in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Unsurprisingly, a central focus of the Act is the provision of relief and support for hospitals and health care providers on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.  This article provides a brief overview of some of the major pieces of the CARES Act, and the firm will provide additional updates on key aspects of the Act.
Continue Reading CARES Act Provides Vital Financial Support for Health Care Providers on COVID-19 Front Lines

On March 17, the Trump Administration announced expanded reimbursement for clinicians providing telehealth services for Medicare beneficiaries during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published an announcement, a fact sheet and Frequently Asked Questions.  To further facilitate telehealth services, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued a notification describing certain technologies that would be permitted to be used for telehealth without being subject to penalties under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations (HIPAA). In addition, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) announced it will allow healthcare providers to reduce or waive cost-sharing for telehealth visits.
Continue Reading Federal Government Significantly Expands Telehealth Reimbursement During COVID-19 Public Health Emergency

The Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed) has revised its U.S. Code of Ethics for Interactions with Health Care Professionals, with updates that take effect January 1, 2020. Until then, the current AdvaMed Code remains in effect.

Continue Reading AdvaMed Revises Code of Ethics on Interactions with Health Care Professionals

On June 13, 2019, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont signed into law Public Act No. 19-19 “An Act Concerning Epinephrine Auto Injectors” (PA 19-19), which went into effect on the same date.

This legislation expands access to epinephrine, which can be lifesaving when treating anaphylactic allergic reactions. PA 19-19 permits “authorized entities” to acquire and maintain a supply of epinephrine cartridge injectors, subject to certain conditions. With a few exceptions, authorized entities are for-profit or nonprofit entities or organizations that employ at least one “person with training.”
Continue Reading Connecticut Enacts Law to Increase Access to Epinephrine Auto Injectors