Long Term Care Facilities

On November 12, 2021, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued finalized guidance (“Guidance”) clarifying that hospitals can share space, services, or personnel with another hospital or health care provider so long as they demonstrate independent compliance with the Medicare Conditions of Participation (CoPs). This Guidance, which finalizes the prior draft guidance issued on May 3, 2019, explains how CMS and state agency surveyors will evaluate a hospital’s space sharing or contracted staff arrangements when assessing the hospital’s compliance with the Medicare CoPs.  The Guidance took effect immediately upon publication on November 12, 2021.

As relayed by CMS, hospitals have increasingly co-located with other hospitals or other healthcare entities as they seek efficiencies and develop different delivery systems of care. Co-location occurs when two Medicare certified hospitals or a Medicare certified hospital and another healthcare entity are located on the same campus or in the same building and share space, staff, or services.
Continue Reading CMS Finalizes Guidance on Hospital Co-Location

To ensure the continued availability of health care workers, on November 12, 2021, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) issued Order 2021-13 (COVID-19 Public Health Emergency Order No. 2021-13), extending licensure reciprocity for certain out-of-state providers to provide services (in person or via telemedicine) to patients in Massachusetts. Order 2021-13 extends prior DPH orders which authorized issuance of temporary licenses for certain health care providers and renewal or reactivation of certain temporary licenses.
Continue Reading Massachusetts DPH Issues Two Orders To Ensure Continued Availability of Health Care Provider Workforce

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is moving forward with its Patients over Paperwork initiative, which was created in accordance with President Trump’s Executive Order directing federal agencies to reduce burdensome regulations in order to improve the patient and provider experience, and the health care system as a whole. On September 26, 2019, CMS passed the Omnibus Burden Reduction (Conditions of Participation) Final Rule (Final Rule), with the goal of removing CMS regulations that have become extraneous or burdensome on health care providers, allowing providers to increase and improve focus on patients. CMS estimates savings resulting from the Final Rule will be 4.4 million hours of time, and $800 million annually. The Final Rule was published on September 30, 2019, and goes into effect 60 days thereafter. Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs), however, have six months to implement antibiotic stewardship programs and CAHs have eighteen months to implement Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement (QAPI) programs.
Continue Reading CMS Passes Final Rule Reducing Regulations Burdensome on Health Care Providers

The Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine (BORM) recently approved significant changes to regulations governing the licensure and practice of medicine. The new regulations became effective on August 9, 2019. Physicians and health care organizations in Massachusetts would be well-advised to review the updated regulations closely – among the new provisions are regulations that potentially will affect current practices regarding the delegation of services to non-licensed individuals, procedures for obtaining informed consent, and other aspects of medical practice.
Continue Reading Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine Makes Significant Changes to Regulations Governing Licensure and Practice of Medicine

The New York Senate and Assembly recently passed Senate Bill S2844B to strengthen current laws for employees who are victims of wage theft to secure and collect unpaid wages from their employers for work already performed. This bill would amend five sections of the law (Lien Law; Labor Law; Attachment under the Civil Practice Law and Rules; the Business Corporations Law; and the Limited Liability Law). If signed by the Governor, this bill would create a broad right for any employee to obtain a lien on an employer’s property based on the allegation of a wage claim and would significantly increase employee power in such disputes.
Continue Reading New York Legislature Passes Bill Allowing Employees to Place a Lien on Employer’s Property for Wage Claims

On June 13, 2019, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont signed into law Public Act No. 19-19 “An Act Concerning Epinephrine Auto Injectors” (PA 19-19), which went into effect on the same date.

This legislation expands access to epinephrine, which can be lifesaving when treating anaphylactic allergic reactions. PA 19-19 permits “authorized entities” to acquire and maintain a supply of epinephrine cartridge injectors, subject to certain conditions. With a few exceptions, authorized entities are for-profit or nonprofit entities or organizations that employ at least one “person with training.”
Continue Reading Connecticut Enacts Law to Increase Access to Epinephrine Auto Injectors

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a Proposed Rule scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on June 8, 2017, revising its prior restrictions on binding arbitration provisions between long term care facilities and their residents set forth in a Final Rule published in October 2017.  Comments are due sixty days after publication of the Proposed Rule. In the Final Rule published last year, CMS had prohibited pre-dispute binding arbitration agreements and imposed requirements on facilities that asked residents to sign arbitration agreements.  The U.S. District Court for the District of Missouri had issued a preliminary injunction  against CMS prior to the Final Rule taking effect.  After the court ruling, CMS issued a memorandum to states and Medicare contractors notifying them that the Final Rule would not be enforced until the injunction was lifted.

The Proposed Rule also comes on the heels of a closely-watched case we reported on earlier relating to nursing home arbitration agreements, Kindred Nursing Centers Ltd v. Clark, et al. In that case, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Federal Arbitration Act preempted a rule applied by a state court that had refused to enforce binding arbitration agreements between a nursing home and individuals who held general powers of attorney on behalf of residents.


Continue Reading CMS Reverses Direction in Proposed Rule on Long Term Care Facility Arbitration Agreements