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New York Legislature Passes Bill Allowing Employees to Place a Lien on Employer’s Property for Wage Claims

The New York Senate and Assembly recently passed Senate Bill S2844B to strengthen current laws for employees who are victims of wage theft to secure and collect unpaid wages from their employers for work already performed. This bill would amend five sections of the law (Lien Law; Labor Law; Attachment under the Civil Practice Law and Rules; the Business Corporations Law; and the Limited Liability Law). If signed by the Governor, this bill would create a broad right for any employee to obtain a lien on an employer’s property based …

Connecticut Enacts Law to Increase Access to Epinephrine Auto Injectors

On June 13, 2019, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont signed into law Public Act No. 19-19 “An Act Concerning Epinephrine Auto Injectors” (PA 19-19), which went into effect on the same date.

This legislation expands access to epinephrine, which can be lifesaving when treating anaphylactic allergic reactions. PA 19-19 permits “authorized entities” to acquire and maintain a supply of epinephrine cartridge injectors, subject to certain conditions. With a few exceptions, authorized entities are for-profit or nonprofit entities or organizations that employ at least one “person with training.” The new …

New York Court of Appeals Upholds Thirteen-Hour Rule for Home Health Aide Pay

On March 26, 2019, the New York Court of Appeals upheld the state Department of Labor’s (the DOL) so-called “13-hour rule” governing payment of home health care aides who work 24-hour shifts. In a closely-watched decision with significant ramifications for the state’s home health industry,  New York’s highest court reversed two 2017 appellate decisions that had overturned the DOL’s  rule and caused substantial uncertainty for home health providers throughout the state.  In short, the New York Court of Appeals confirmed that New York home health care aides may be paid …

OSHA Clarifies Position On Anti-Retaliation Rule

On October 11, 2018, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) issued a memorandum to clarify its position regarding whether drug testing policies and safety incentive programs would be considered violations of OSHA’s regulations. Employers may recall that, in May 2016, OSHA published a final rule that, among other requirements, prohibited employers from retaliating against employees for reporting work-related injuries or illnesses. That portion of the final rule became known as the Anti-Retaliation Rule. Almost immediately, there was confusion over which workplace safety incentive programs and post-incident drug testing policies, …

Recent Joint Commission Guidance Recommends Steps for Health Care Organizations to Reduce Workplace Violence

Workplace violence is a risk at any health care workplace. Whether from patients, residents, clients, or employees. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) estimates that three quarters of all workplace assaults reported annually – approximately 19,000 – occurred in health care and social service settings.

While OSHA does not have any specific regulations addressing violence in the workplace, OSHA’s General Duty Clause applies to covered employers and requires they provide their employees with a place of employment that is “free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely …

Ninth Circuit Denies Arbitration in a False Claims Act Case

On September 11, 2017, the Ninth Circuit in US and State of Nevada ex rel. Welch v. My Left Foot Children’s Therapy, LLC, upheld the denial of the defendant’s motion to compel arbitration in a False Claims Act (FCA) relator case, holding that an employee-relator’s FCA claims did not fall within the scope of the arbitration agreement with her former employer.  The FCA claims were based on allegations that the employer had filed fraudulent Medicaid claims.

The Court first looked to the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) in determining that …

Appeals Court Reverses ADA Jury Verdict for Pharmacist with Fear of Needles

In Stevens v. Rite Aid Corp., No. 15-277 (March 21, 2017), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reversed a jury award of almost $2 million that had been awarded in favor of a pharmacist who had a fear of needles and could not comply with Rite Aid’s new policy that required pharmacists to administer immunization injections to customers.

In 2011, in an effort to fill a vaccination void in the healthcare market, Rite Aid imposed a new requirement that all pharmacists must administer immunizations.  Rite Aid …

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