On April 1, 2020, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont announced a medical surge plan to address the state’s needs for responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency. The plan, under which the state will collaborate with long-term care facilities, involves the creation of dedicated spaces for COVID-19 positive patients and moving non-infected patients to separate facilities.
Continue Reading Governor Lamont’s Announces COVID-19 Medical Surge Plan that Includes Opening of Vacant Nursing Homes

Massachusetts continues to issue additional directives and guidance for the health care provider community in response to COVID-19. In this post we highlight new orders by Massachusetts Governor Baker, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), and MassHealth. Updates include expanded license reciprocity for non-physicians, independent practice of certain Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs), waiver of certain MassHealth requirements in the discharge and transfer of long-term care patients, and authorization for EOHHS to establish temporary rates, supplemental payments, or alternative rates and payment methodologies for certain providers. MassHealth has also issued FAQs for behavioral health providers utilizing telehealth to provide services.
Continue Reading Massachusetts Issues Further COVID-19 Updates for Providers

On July 18, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published a Final Rule establishing requirements for arbitration agreements between long-term care (LTC) facilities and their residents. The Final Rule represents a revamping by CMS of a prior rule that had been published in October 2016 that prohibited pre-dispute binding arbitration agreements. CMS undertook to revise the 2016 rule after the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi enjoined enforcement of the prohibition on pre-dispute binding arbitration agreements.

Continue Reading CMS Issues Final Rule Restricting Arbitration Agreements with Long Term Care Facilities

On July 1, 2019, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont signed into law Public Act No. 19-89 “An Act Concerning Nursing Home Staffing Levels” (PA 19-89). PA 19-89 sets forth new state-level daily nurse staffing level disclosure requirements for nursing home facilities (including nursing homes and rest homes with nursing supervision as set forth in Conn. Gen. Stat. § 19a-521), authorizes the Department of Public Health (DPH) to take disciplinary action against or issue citations to nursing home facilities for non-compliance with nurse staffing requirements, and newly requires nursing home facilities and residential care homes to take remedial actions in the event employees or residents suffer retaliation as a result of filing or reporting any violation of these staffing level disclosure requirements or other state law obligations. PA 19-89 is intended to reflect federal nursing home staffing regulations. PA 19-89 becomes effective October 1, 2019.
Continue Reading Connecticut Codifies Nursing Home Daily Posting Requirements, Adds Requirement for Reinstatement after Retaliation

On May 15, 2017, in a closely-watched case involving arbitration clauses in nursing home contracts and powers of attorney, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Federal Arbitration Act preempted a rule applied by the Kentucky Supreme Court when it refused to enforce two binding arbitration agreements between a nursing home and individuals holding general powers of attorney on behalf of two former residents of the nursing home.  Kindred Nursing Centers Ltd v. Clark, et al. 

As part of the nursing home’s resident intake process, the two individuals holding powers of attorney entered into arbitration agreements on behalf of their relatives that contained a provision requiring that “[a]ny and all claims or controversies arising out of or in any way relating to . . . the Resident’s stay at the Facility” would be resolved through “binding arbitration.” After the death of their family members, the individuals holding powers of attorney sued in state court, alleging that the nursing home had delivered substandard care, causing the deaths of their family members. The Kentucky Supreme Court applied a “clear-statement rule” in holding that both arbitration agreements were invalid because the powers of attorney did not specifically state that the representatives could enter into an arbitration agreement, and therefore the individuals holding powers of attorney were prohibited from restricting their relatives’ rights of access to the courts and trial by jury guaranteed under the Kentucky Constitution.


Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court – the FAA Preempts State Court Ruling in Nursing Home Arbitration Case