On November 1, 2022, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued final rules concerning the 2023 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) payment rates and 2023 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS). These final rules implement various updates and policy changes for Medicare payments under the PFS and OPPS, and made significant updates to the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), which go into effect on or after January 1, 2023. We summarize the key changes below and will elaborate on these rules in future posts.

Continue Reading CMS Issues Final Rules Concerning the 2023 Outpatient Prospective Payment System Rates and Physician Fee Schedule

On November 20, 2020, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published its long-awaited and highly anticipated final rule updating regulations promulgated under the Physician Self-Referral or “Stark” law (the OIG simultaneously published updates to the Anti-Kickback Statute regulations). Among other things, CMS introduced new Stark exceptions for certain “value-based arrangements,” the donation

On July 18, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published a Final Rule establishing requirements for arbitration agreements between long-term care (LTC) facilities and their residents. The Final Rule represents a revamping by CMS of a prior rule that had been published in October 2016 that prohibited pre-dispute binding arbitration agreements. CMS undertook to revise the 2016 rule after the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi enjoined enforcement of the prohibition on pre-dispute binding arbitration agreements.

Continue Reading CMS Issues Final Rule Restricting Arbitration Agreements with Long Term Care Facilities

In a Memorandum Opinion, Judge Amit P. Mehta, of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, vacated a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Final Rule, just days before its July 9 effective date. The Final Rule would have required the list prices of prescription drugs to be included in direct-to-consumer advertisements.
Continue Reading Federal Judge Vacates Final Rule on Drug Pricing Transparency in Consumer Advertising

On May 10, 2019, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services published a Final Rule on drug pricing transparency in consumer advertisements. The new rule requires direct-to-consumer (DTC) television advertisements to include the list price of prescription drugs and biological products distributed in the US that are reimbursable by Medicare or Medicaid, whether directly or indirectly.

Continue Reading CMS Final Rule on Drug Pricing Transparency in Consumer Television Ads

On December 31, 2018, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a final rule (Final Rule) establishing the “Pathways to Success” program that overhauls the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP). The Final Rule largely mirrors CMS’ proposed rule (see our summary here), but with several modifications in response to public comments. Accountable care organizations (ACOs) may participate in the Pathways to Success program beginning July 1, 2019, and those ACOs interested in beginning participation in July must submit to CMS a notice of intent to apply by January 18, 2019. CMS guidance on submission of the NOIA is available here. CMS expects to release application deadlines in the near future.

Significant features of the Pathways to Success program, which are described in detail below, include:

  • Replacement of Track 1, Track 2 and Track 3 with two participation options: the BASIC track (consisting of five levels) and ENHANCED track (similar to the current Track 3),
  • Creation of a “glide path” that requires ACOs to incrementally accept performance-based downside risk over the agreement period,
  • Requiring ACOs experienced with downside risk to assume downside risk, while allowing inexperienced ACOs an option to begin participation with no downside risk before advancing to riskier models,
  • Replacement of the previous three-year participation agreement period with a five-year period,
  • Creation of a six-month performance year from July 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019 to coincide with the one-time mid-year start date,
  • Revisions to the benchmarking methodology to incorporate regional trends from the beginning of an ACO’s participation in the MSSP,
  • Expansion of ACOs’ use of telehealth and availability of the SNF Three-Day Rule Waiver, and
  • Ability for ACOs to provide monetary incentives to encourage beneficiaries to receive certain primary care services.


Continue Reading CMS Finalizes Overhaul of the Medicare Shared Savings Program in “Pathways to Success” Final Rule

On June 1, 2018, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) announced it was once again delaying the final rule that had set forth the calculation for the 340B Program ceiling price and drug manufacturer civil monetary penalties (Final Rule).  Enforcement on the Final Rule is delayed to July 1, 2019. 
Continue Reading HHS Delays 340B Program Final Rule on Drug Ceiling Price and Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties (Again)

On February 21, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Final Rule, amending its regulations on acceptance of data from investigations for medical devices that are performed outside of the United States as well as modifying certain regulations applicable to data from US-sited investigations. The Final Rule does not go into effect until February 21, 2019 – a full year after promulgation.  The FDA also issued guidance in the form of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) addressing the new regulations.  In the FAQ document, the FDA explained its rationale that more research and marketing applications and submissions are being submitted that are supported by foreign investigations and that it was seeking to make its requirements more uniform.
Continue Reading FDA Amends Regulations for Acceptance of Data from Foreign and Domestic Investigation for Medical Devices

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it was delaying until March 19, 2018, a Final Rule that has been viewed as having a chilling effect on scientific speech in attempting to broaden FDA’s authority to find an “intended use” for an approved or cleared medical product.  FDA extended the effective date to allow additional public comments after a petition filed on behalf of various industry groups challenged the Final Rule (dockets FDA-2011-P-0512, FDA-2013-P-1079, FDA-2015-N-2002, and FDA-2016-N-1149).

In the Final Rule, FDA had amended the intended use regulations for drugs and devices at 21 C.F.R 201.128 (drugs) and 21 C.F.R. 801.4 (devices).  In announcing the delayed implementation, FDA attempted to clear up what it viewed as a misunderstanding about the Final Rule.  FDA emphasized that one of the revisions was meant to clarify that mere knowledge that the product was being prescribed or used by healthcare providers for an unapproved new use would not be sufficient on its own for FDA to find an unapproved new intended use for an approved or cleared drug or device.  In addition, the Final Rule was “intended to embody FDA’s longstanding position . . . that intended use can be based on ‘any relevant source of evidence,’ including a variety of direct and circumstantial evidence.”  The Final Rule used the phrase “the totality of the evidence” to accomplish this goal.

Continue Reading FDA Delays Intended Use Regulations

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently issued a Final Rule to streamline and address the substantial backlog of Medicare administrative appeals at the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) and Departmental Appeals Board (DAB)/Medicare Appeals Council levels.

Among other changes to the appeals process, the Final Rule:

  • Permits the designation of Medicare Appeals Council decisions as precedential, in order to provide clarity
  • Gives attorney adjudicators certain authority that had been previously reserved to the ALJs, including the authority to decide appeals that can be determined without a hearing, to review dismissals by the Qualified Independent Contractors (QIC) and Independent Review Entities (IRE), to issue remands to CMS contractors, and to dismiss requests for hearing when a request is withdrawn by an appellant
  • Limits the number of CMS or CMS contractors that can be a participant or party at the hearings
  • Creates efficiencies by, among other things, allowing ALJs to vacate their own dismissals as opposed to requiring the appellants to appeal a dismissal to the Medicare Appeals Council, using telephone hearings, and requiring appellants to provide more information on what is being appealed
  • Establishes an adjudication time frame for cases remanded from the Medicare Appeals Council
  • Revises remand rules to keep cases moving forward and simplifies the escalation process
  • Provides increased specificity on what would be considered good cause for new evidence to be introduced at the ALJ level


Continue Reading CMS Final Rule Streamlines Appeals Process