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Les Levinson is the co-chair of the Transactional Healthcare Practice Group at Robinson+Cole. His practice concentrates on transactional, regulatory, and compliance matters for healthcare and life science clients, including home care and hospice companies, other non-acute providers, physician practices, hospitals, information technology and medical device companies, healthcare equipment providers and healthcare investors, lenders, and related enterprises and he has completed over 300 M&A and financing transactions. Read his full rc.com bio here.

On June 30, 2022, Governor Gavin Newsom signed the 2022-2023 California state budget, which included a trailer bill, Senate Bill 184 (the Bill) which makes numerous statutory revisions impacting health programs and consumers. The Bill establishes the Office of Health Care Affordability (OHCA) within the Department of Health Care Access and Information to combat rising health care costs. California will join other states such as Massachusetts, Oregon, and Nevada in implementing a health care cost commission.

Continue Reading California Governor Signs Trailer Bill to State Budget Increasing Oversight of Health Care Entities Statewide

This fall, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed Assembly Bill No. 2673 (the Bill), which amends various sections of the California Health and Safety Code relating to hospice agencies. Among other things, the Bill prohibits hospice agency license transfers; adds requirements for hospice agency license applicants; increases oversight authority by the California State Department of Public Health (the Department); and updates the moratorium on new hospice agency licenses.

Continue Reading California Governor Signs Bill Further Increasing Oversight of Hospice Agencies

On December 23, 2022, New York Governor Kathy Hochul vetoed Assembly Bill Number 8472  entitled “An Act To Amend The Public Health Law, In Relation To The Establishment, Incorporation, Construction, Or Increase In Capacity Of For-Profit Hospice” (the Act). The Act was intended to prohibit the approval, incorporation, or construction of for-profit hospices and would have also prevented any existing for-profit hospices from increasing capacity. The Act would have gone into effect immediately had it not been vetoed.

Continue Reading New York Governor Vetoes Act Prohibiting Establishment and Expansion of For-Profit Hospices

On December 27, 2022, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a proposed rule (Proposed Rule) which proposes certain policy and technical changes to Medicare regulations, including a notable change to the current standard under the “60-Day Rule” for identifying a Medicare overpayment. Specifically, CMS indicated that it is proposing to (i) “adopt by reference” the federal False Claims Act’s (FCA) definitions of “knowing” and “knowingly” as governing when an overpayment is identified, and (ii) eliminate the “reasonable diligence” standard that has been in place, but subject to challenges, for a number of years.

Continue Reading No More Reasonable Diligence? CMS Proposes to Change Standard for Identifying Medicare Overpayments to Align with False Claims Act

On November 4, 2022, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published the calendar year 2023 Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate final rule, which updates Medicare payment policies and rates for home health agencies.  Some of the key changes implemented by the final rule are summarized below.

Continue Reading CMS Issues Calendar Year 2023 Home Health Final Rule

On August 18, 2022, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed S-315, “An Act concerning changes in control of health care entities” (the Act). The Act implements employment protection for healthcare workers when certain licensed health care facilities, staffing registries, and home care services in New Jersey undergo a change in ownership. The Act first requires that former health care entity employers provide the successor health care entity with information pertaining to employees (i.e., employee names, addresses, dates of hire, phone numbers, wage rates, employment classifications) not less than thirty days before a change in control. The Act also requires former health care entity owners to inform eligible employees of the rights provided by the Act and to post a notice of their rights under the Act in a conspicuous location.

Continue Reading New Jersey Governor Signs Act Concerning Changes in Control of Health Care Entities

On June 2, 2022, the New York State Legislature passed A08472, “An Act to Amend the Public Health Law, in Relation to the Establishment, Incorporation, Construction, or Increase in Capacity of For-Profit Hospice” (“the Act”). The Act prohibits the Public Health and Health Planning Council (PHHPC) of the New York Department of Health (DOH) from approving any new applications for the establishment, incorporation, or construction of a for-profit hospice. Additionally, the bill prohibits PHHPC from approving any increases in capacity to existing for-profit hospices in the state. The two current for-profit hospices will remain approved but cannot expand capacity. The Act will now be presented to the Governor for signature. Once signed by the Governor, the Act will become effective immediately.

Continue Reading New York State Legislature Passes Act Enacting Moratorium on For-Profit Hospices

The New York State Department of Health (DOH) recently released a “Dear Administrator Letter” (DAL) DHCSB 22-02 for Licensed Home Care Services Agencies (LCHSAs).  The DAL addresses guidance and procedures for LCHAs as they relate to certain administrative licensure amendments.  Such amendments include changing the service, county of operation, sites, address of agency or operator, the corporate name or assumed name (d/b/a), or closing a site.
Continue Reading New York State Department of Health Releases Administrative Guidance for LCHSAs’ Licensure Amendments

The New York Department of Health (DOH) proposed amendments and additions to 10 NYCRR 765 that would amend application processes for Licensed Home Care Services Agencies (LHCSA). These regulatory changes stem from the 2018 NY State budget, which established a two-year moratorium on LHCSA applications and stipulated certain changes to licensure requirements. If finalized, the proposed regulations will create new public need and financial feasibility requirements for LHCSA applications, in addition to the existing character and competence requirement, and will change what constitutes an application amendment requiring the approval of the Public Health and Health Planning Council (PHHPC).

Continue Reading New York DOH Proposed New Licensure Regulations for LHCSAs to be Effective April 1, 2020

On October 31, 2019, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized its 2020 payment and policy changes rule for Home Health Agencies (HHA Rule).  The final rule is scheduled to be posted in the Federal Register on November 8, 2019 (see the since published rule), and allows for comments until December 30 in advance of its January 1, 2020, effective date. The HHA Rule makes changes to the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS), including the implementation of the Patient-Driven Groupings Model (PDGM), and makes other policy changes for home health agencies to the Home Health Value-Based Purchasing (HHVBP) Model and the Home Health Quality Reporting Program (HH QRP).  These changes further the shift to a value-based payment system focusing on patient need over volume of care.
Continue Reading CMS Finalizes 2020 Home Health Agency Payment and Policy Changes