Nathaniel Arden

Nathaniel Arden

Nathaniel Arden is a member of Robinson+Cole’s Health Law Group. He advises hospitals, physician groups, community providers, and other health care entities on a wide variety of health law and business matters. He regularly assists clients with transactional and regulatory issues, including Medicare and Medicaid fraud and abuse, health information privacy and security, compliance, licensure, clinical trials and health care-related information technology issues. Read his full rc.com bio here.

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New York Further Expands Facility Capacity and Practitioner Capacity in New Executive Order

On March 23, 2020, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order (Executive Order) related to the COVID-19 public health emergency to ease regulatory requirements and expand the resources available to address the emergency.

Significant provisions of the Executive Order are as follows:

Provisions to Expand Facility Capacity

  • Orders the Commissioner of Health to direct all general hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, office-based surgery practices and diagnostic and treatment centers to increase the number of beds available to patients, including by canceling all elective surgeries and procedures, as determined by

OIG Warns of COVID-19 Fraud Schemes

The US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) released a fraud alert warning Medicare beneficiaries of potentially fraudulent schemes that take advantage of the fears surrounding the COVID-19 public health emergency. The OIG warns that fraudsters are targeting Medicare beneficiaries through telemarketing, social media and even in-person, door-to-door contact. According to the OIG, the fraudulent schemes often involve an offer of a COVID-19 test in exchange for an individual providing personal information.…

Connecticut Issues Order Temporarily Recognizing Reciprocal Health Care Practitioner Licenses

In alignment with both New York and Massachusetts, earlier today Connecticut’s Commissioner of the Department of Public Health issued an order (Order) permitting physicians, nurses, respiratory care practitioners, emergency medical services personnel and other health care practitioners who are licensed in another state to provide temporary assistance in Connecticut for a period of 60 days. The Order is subject to the following conditions:

  • No practitioner may provide services beyond the scope of practice permitted under Connecticut law relating to the applicable profession;
  • Each practitioner must maintain malpractice and other insurance

DEA Allows Providers to Prescribe Controlled Substances Without an In-Person Medical Examination During COVID-19 Public Health Emergency

The Federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) issued guidance permitting DEA-registered practitioners to prescribe controlled substances without an in-person medical exam of the patient for the duration of the COVID-19 public health emergency. …

DOJ and FTC Announce Draft Vertical Merger Guidelines

On January 10, 2020, The Department of Justice (DOJ) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced new draft vertical merger guidelines for public comment. Once finalized, the draft guidelines will replace the DOJ’s 1984 Non-Horizontal Merger Guidelines and describe how the FTC and the DOJ will analyze and enforce vertical mergers for compliance with the antitrust laws. Vertical mergers combine two or more companies operating at different levels of the same supply chain, e.g., a combination between a hospital and independent physician group, or a health system and a skilled nursing …

DOJ Reaches Settlement with Patient Assistance Foundation Resolving Allegations of FCA Violations

On January 21, 2020, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced a $3 million settlement with Patient Services, Inc. (PSI) to resolve allegations of False Claims Act (FCA) violations. The DOJ alleged that PSI enabled three pharmaceutical companies to pay kickbacks to patients by funneling money to patients taking drugs manufactured by those same pharmaceutical companies. In addition to the $3 million, PSI has entered into a three-year integrity agreement with Health and Human Services’s Office of the Inspector General. The settlement involved no determination of liability.…

Connecticut Governor Lamont Issues Executive Orders Aiming to Contain Health Care Cost Growth and Improve Transparency

On January 22, 2020, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont issued two health care-related executive orders, Executive Order No. 5 and Executive Order No. 6, (the Executive Orders) to address the increasing cost of health care in Connecticut. The Executive Orders build upon the state’s Office of Health Strategy’s (OHS) obligation to create a health care cost-containment strategy for Connecticut.…

DOJ Announces FCA Lawsuit Settlement with Spinal Device Manufacturer and Senior Executives for Alleged Kickbacks Paid to Surgeons

On November 7, 2019, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced it had settled a False Claims Act (FCA) lawsuit against Life Spine, a spinal device manufacturer, and two of Life Spine’s senior executives. The settlement totaled $5.99 million and included various admissions of responsibility to settle allegations of kickbacks paid by Life Spine that the DOJ claimed were designed to induce surgeons to utilize Life Spine devices and submit claims to federal health programs for these improperly-induced utilizations in violation of the federal anti-kickback statute (AKS) and FCA. The settlement …

HHS Proposes Changes to Permit Donation of Cybersecurity Technology

On October 17, 2019, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published proposed rules to update the regulatory Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) safe-harbors and exceptions to the Physician Self-Referral (PSR) Law, known commonly as the Stark Law (AKS proposed rule available here; PSR proposed rule available here). In an earlier blog post, we described each of the proposed rules. Among the proposed changes are a new safe harbor/exception that would generally permit entities to donate certain cybersecurity technology and related services to physicians, subject to compliance with …

HHS Issues Favorable Advisory Opinion Permitting Community Health Center to Purchase Real Estate from an Excluded Individual

On September 6, 2019, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) issued OIG Advisory Opinion No. 19-05 (Advisory Opinion) permitting a community health center (Requestor) to purchase real estate from a limited liability company (LLC) owned and managed by an individual excluded from participation in federal health care programs (Proposed Arrangement). The OIG indicated the Proposed Arrangement would not result in the imposition of sanctions under the civil monetary penalties law because no claims for reimbursement from federal programs would be sought by …

HHS Issues Favorable Advisory Opinion for Online Health Care Directory Charging Per-Click Fees

On September 5, 2019, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) issued OIG Advisory Opinion 19-04 (Advisory Opinion). The Requestor asked OIG if providing an online health care provider directory (Directory) to federal health care program beneficiaries (beneficiaries) would violate the Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) or constitute a prohibited Beneficiary Inducement. The online directory would allow beneficiaries to search and book medical appointments, and the Requestor would charge health care professionals a per-click or per-booking fee to be listed in the directory. The directory …

White House Issues Executive Order to Increase Transparency in American Healthcare

On June 24, 2019, President Donald Trump issued an “Executive Order on Improving Price and Quality Transparency in American Healthcare to Put Patients First” (the Order). The Order requires multiple federal agencies to issue regulations and take other actions as part of an ongoing focus of the Trump Administration to “enhance the ability of patients to choose the healthcare that is best for them” through transparency and competition. The Order addresses the following five initiatives.…

CMS Announces New Direct Contracting Care Models

On April 22, 2019, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced two new voluntary risk-sharing payment models—Professional Population-Based Payment (PBP) and Global PBP. Under the Professional PBP model, CMS will pay participating organizations (referred to as Direct Contracting Entities or DCEs) a monthly, risk-adjusted primary care capitation payment, as well as 50 percent of shared savings/losses for enhanced primary care services. The Global PBP model, which is aimed at larger organizations, offers a higher level of risk and reward. DCEs participating in the Global PBP will receive/be responsible …

Connecticut Superior Court Ruling Addresses 2016 Physician Non-Compete Law

Connecticut’s Superior Court Stamford recently ruled to modify four physician non-compete agreements into compliance with Connecticut’s physician non-compete statute (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 20-14p), which limits certain covenants not to complete involving physicians to one year after employment and in a 15-mile geographic radius from the physician’s primary practice site, among other restrictions. Importantly, the Connecticut non-compete statute applies to non-competes that are “entered into, amended, extended or renewed on or after July 1, 2016.”…

OIG Disapproves of Drug Company’s Plan to Provide Hospitals Free Medications in Advisory Opinion

On November 16, 2018, the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services (OIG) posted an unfavorable Advisory Opinion No. 18-14 regarding an arrangement where a vendor (Requestor) of a commonly used drug would supply free doses of the drug to hospitals for treatment of inpatients with a rare and serious form of epilepsy (Proposed Arrangement). The drug is not separately reimbursable in the inpatient setting. As a result, and according to the Requestor, many hospitals do not stock sufficient quantities of the drug and …

2019 Physician Fee Schedule Rule Review: Use of Telehealth Expanded

Telehealth for Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

As part of the CY 2019 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS), the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued an interim final rule with comment period to expand the use of telehealth for the treatment of substance use disorders and co-occurring mental health disorders. Existing law provides for reimbursement of telehealth services only if the originating site is located in a rural health professional shortage area, is not in a metropolitan statistical area or is an entity that participates in a federal …

OIG Issues Favorable Advisory Opinion Regarding Health Plan’s Incentive Payment Program

On October 18, 2018, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Department of Health and Human Services published a favorable Advisory Opinion regarding a Medicaid managed care organization’s (Requestor) proposal to pay incentives to its network providers who meet benchmarks for increasing the amount of early and periodic screening, diagnostic, and treatment (EPSDT) services provided to Medicaid beneficiaries (Proposed Arrangement).…

OIG Reports That CMS Paid Practitioners For Telehealth Services That Failed To Meet Medicare Requirements

On April 5, 2018, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) announced its findings that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) paid practitioners for telehealth services that did not meet Medicare requirements. Certain telehealth services are reimbursable by Medicare as Part B services. According to the OIG, it engaged in a review of telehealth services after finding that Medicare paid a total of $17.6 million in telehealth payments in 2015, compared to just $61,302 in 2001.…

CMS Issues Guidance on Texting Patient Information

On December 28, 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a memo to state survey agency directors clarifying its position on the use of text messaging among health care providers. In its memo, CMS stated that it does not permit texting of patient orders by health care providers, as texting of patient orders does not comply with the applicable Medicare conditions of participation (COPs), specifically 42 C.F.R. § 489.24. Instead of texting patient orders, CMS states that its preference is for health care providers to either hand-write …

The Joint Commission Relaxes Process for Credentialing Independent Pathologists

Effective January 3, 2018, The Joint Commission (TJC) has revised its standards to no longer require TJC-accredited hospitals, critical access hospitals, and ambulatory care organizations to credential and privilege pathologists that provide diagnostic services through reference laboratories. TJC Introduction to Leadership Standard LD.04.03.09 generally requires that each hospital, critical access hospital or ambulatory care organization credential and privilege all licensed independent practitioners from whom it receives laboratory services under a contractual relationship. A new exception has been added to the general rule to state that the hospital, critical access hospital …

CMS Updates Hospital Compare Website

CMS recently announced updates to its Hospital Compare website. CMS provides the Hospital Compare website to give patients, their families and other health care stakeholders information on the performance of hospitals participating in Medicare. CMS also provides a star rating for each hospital to assist patients in choosing a hospital for their care. CMS updated the star rating methodology in response to feedback from hospitals and other industry stakeholders. In addition to changes to the statistical modeling used, CMS has decreased the emphasis on patient experience and increased the importance …

OIG Rescinds Advisory Opinion Due to Requestor’s Failure to Disclose Information

On November 28, 2017, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) rescinded advisory opinion 06-04, in which it had previously determined that a charity’s (Requestor) proposal to provide assistance to financially needy Medicare beneficiaries did not warrant the imposition of sanctions. The OIG explained that “public interest requires rescission” after finding that Requestor failed to comply with earlier factual certifications that were material to the original advisory opinion.

Under the program, the Requestor provides assistance with premiums and cost-sharing obligations for patients with two specific chronic diseases. Most of the …

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