Connecticut Expands Consumer Protections Against Identity Theft and Data Breaches

On June 4, 2018, Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed into law Public Act No. 18-90 “An Act Concerning Security Freezes on Credit Reports, Identity Theft Prevention Services and Regulations of Credit Rating Agencies” (P.A. 18-90).  This bill makes several revisions to Connecticut laws concerning identity theft, most notably by newly prohibiting credit reporting agencies from charging fees for consumers to place or remove security freezes. This law takes effect on October 1, 2018. Continue Reading

New Connecticut Legislation Updates Laws Concerning Urgent Care Centers, Hospital-Based Facility Fees and Freestanding Hospital Emergency Departments

On June 12, 2018, Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed into law Public Act No. 18-149 “An Act Concerning Outpatient Clinics, Urgent Care Centers and Freestanding Emergency Departments” (PA 18-149). This legislation makes several changes to Connecticut laws concerning urgent care centers, facility fees charged at off-site hospital-based facilities, and freestanding emergency departments. PA 18-149 is effective as of October 1, 2018. Continue Reading

Connecticut Legislature Again Addresses Opioid Crisis

On June 14, 2018, Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed into law Public Act No. 18-166 “An Act Concerning the Prevention and Treatment of Opioid Dependency and Opioid Overdoses in the State” (PA 18-166).

This legislation seeks to address the ongoing opioid crisis in Connecticut in part by: (i) implementing a new opioid overdose reporting requirement for hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, (ii) establishing a statutory framework under which health care practitioners and pharmacists may partner with law enforcement or other government agencies, EMS providers, or community health organizations to expand distribution and availability of naloxone and similar drugs, (iii) enacting statutory limitations on the circumstances in which providers may prescribe controlled substances for family members or themselves, and (iv) commissioning a study of the feasibility of opioid intervention courts. This legislation has varying effective dates, which are noted below. Continue Reading

Recent Joint Commission Guidance Recommends Steps for Health Care Organizations to Reduce Workplace Violence

Workplace violence is a risk at any health care workplace. Whether from patients, residents, clients, or employees. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) estimates that three quarters of all workplace assaults reported annually – approximately 19,000 – occurred in health care and social service settings.

While OSHA does not have any specific regulations addressing violence in the workplace, OSHA’s General Duty Clause applies to covered employers and requires they provide their employees with a place of employment that is “free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious harm.” It is OSHA’s position that the General Duty Clause imposes a legal obligation upon an employer to provide a workplace free of conditions or activities “that either the employer or industry recognizes as hazardous and that cause, or are likely to cause, death or serious physical harm to employees when there is a feasible method to abate the hazard.”

In recent years, OSHA has published guidelines to the health care community – Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers – with specific recommendations to prevent violence in health care workplaces. OSHA also has a webpage dedicated to workplace violence, which provides helpful guidance and training materials.

In an effort to further assist health care organizations better prevent and address violence in their workplaces, in April the Joint Commission released a Sentinel Event Alert addressing physical and verbal violence against health care workers. The Joint Commission accredits and certifies health care organizations and programs in the United States.

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Massachusetts Files Suit Against Connecticut-Based Purdue Pharma for Opioid Related Harms

On June 13, 2018, Attorney General Maura Healey filed a complaint in Massachusetts Superior Court on behalf of the Commonwealth against Purdue Pharma Inc. and Purdue Pharma L.P., Connecticut-based drug companies that manufacture and market OxyContin.  The lawsuit also names sixteen individual defendants, including current and former CEOs and certain members of the board of Purdue Pharma Inc. This is not the first time a Purdue Pharma company has been accused of wrongdoing with respect to the marketing of opioids. In 2007, Purdue Frederick Company (an affiliate of Purdue Pharma L.P.) paid nearly $700 million dollars in fines and plead guilty to criminal charges, admitting that, with the intent to defraud or mislead, it marketed and promoted  its drugs as less addictive and less subject to abuse. Continue Reading

Connecticut Enacts Legislation to Address Hospital-Insurer Network Conflicts

On June 6, 2018, Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed into law Public Act No. 18-115 “An Act Concerning Disputes Between Health Carriers and Participating Providers That Are Hospitals” (PA 18-115). This legislation updates state laws concerning the departure or removal of a hospital from an insurance carrier’s provider network. PA 18-115 takes effect July 1, 2018. Continue Reading

Connecticut Enacts Law to Limit Automatic Prescription Refills for Medicaid Beneficiaries

On June 1, 2018, Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed into law Public Act 18-77 “An Act Limiting Auto Refills of Prescription Drugs Covered Under the Medicaid Program and Requiring the Commissioner of Social Services to Provide CHIP Data to the Health Information Technology Officer” (PA 18-77). This legislation allows the Department of Social Services (DSS) to prohibit pharmacies from automatically refilling certain prescription drugs for Medicaid beneficiaries and prohibits DSS from paying for refills of such drugs unless it receives a request for payment from the beneficiary or his or her legal representative. Continue Reading

Connecticut Legislature Revises DSS Provider Audit Processes

On June 1, 2018, Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed into law Public Act No. 18-76 “An Act Concerning Audits of Medical Assistance Providers” (PA 18-76), which makes several changes to the Medicaid provider audit process conducted by or on behalf of the Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS). PA 18-76 is effective July 1, 2018. Continue Reading

HHS Delays 340B Program Final Rule on Drug Ceiling Price and Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties (Again)

On June 1, 2018, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) announced it was once again delaying the final rule that had set forth the calculation for the 340B Program ceiling price and drug manufacturer civil monetary penalties (Final Rule).  Enforcement on the Final Rule is delayed to July 1, 2019.  Continue Reading

OIG Posts Telemedicine Advisory Opinion

The Office of Inspector General (OIG), Health and Human Services issued an Advisory Opinion allowing an arrangement proposed by a federally qualified health center look-alike (FQHC look-alike) to provide free technology items and services to a clinic run by a county Department of Health (County Clinic), that would facilitate telemedicine encounters (the Arrangement).  Although the OIG found that the Arrangement could potentially implicate the anti-kickback statute (AKS), the OIG concluded that it would not impose administrative sanctions. Continue Reading

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