Tag Archives: False Claims Act

Fourth and Fifth Circuits Rely on Escobar to Render Important Fraud Decisions

Recent decisions in the Fourth and Fifth Circuit Courts of Appeals demonstrate the central role that the Supreme Court’s Escobar decision continues to play in fraud litigation despite, or as a result of, continued uncertainty as to the application of the “rigorous” and “demanding” materiality standard endorsed in that decision. The decisions discussed below provide additional circuit-level guidance for litigants, but also raise additional questions as to the scope of the Escobar ruling and the efficacy of the implied false certification theory of FCA liability.

First, on September 29, 2017 …

Ninth Circuit Denies Arbitration in a False Claims Act Case

On September 11, 2017, the Ninth Circuit in US and State of Nevada ex rel. Welch v. My Left Foot Children’s Therapy, LLC, upheld the denial of the defendant’s motion to compel arbitration in a False Claims Act (FCA) relator case, holding that an employee-relator’s FCA claims did not fall within the scope of the arbitration agreement with her former employer.  The FCA claims were based on allegations that the employer had filed fraudulent Medicaid claims.

The Court first looked to the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) in determining that …

Ninth Circuit Relies on Escobar to Revive False Claims Act Suit Against Pharmaceutical Manufacturer

On July 7, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed a federal district court’s dismissal of a False Claims Act (FCA) whistleblower suit in United States ex rel. Campie v. Gilead Sciences, explaining that the district court did not have “the benefit of” the Supreme Court’s 2016 decision in Escobar at the time the suit was dismissed for failure to state a claim under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12(b)(6).…

Third Circuit Recognizes Escobar “Heightened Materiality Standard” in Dismissal of False Claims Act Case Tied to Avastin

In May 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit relied on the “heightened materiality standard” endorsed by the U.S. Supreme Court in its 2016 Escobar decision in dismissing a False Claims Act (FCA) whistleblower suit filed against pharmaceutical giant Genentech related to its billion dollar cancer drug Avastin. In Escobar, the Supreme Court upheld the validity—“at least in some circumstances”—of the “implied false certification” theory of FCA liability, and provided that this theory can attach where at least two conditions are met: a defendant must (1) …

EHR Vendor Settles False Claims Act Suit for $155 Million

Electronic health record (EHR) vendor eClinicalWorks (eCW) recently entered into a settlement with the US Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) to resolve allegations under the federal False Claims Act (FCA) that eCW misrepresented its software and paid customers kickbacks to promote its products. The settlement imposes joint and several liability for payment on the EHR Vendor and three of its founders for $154.92 million, and liability for settlement payments individually by a developer ($50,000) and two project managers …

DOJ Increases Range of Per-Claim Penalties under False Claims Act for 2017

In a little-noticed development, on February 3, 2017, the Department of Justice (DOJ) increased the per-claim range of penalties under the federal False Claims Act (FCA) (31 U.S.C. § 3729 et seq.) for the second successive year, in accordance with a statutory requirement issued under the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015. As a result, FCA defendants are now subject to monetary penalties ranging from $10,957 to $21,916 per claim submitted in violation of the FCA.

Section 701 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 revised federal requirements for determination …

Fourth Circuit Upholds DOJ’s Absolute Veto Power but Declines to Address Validity of Statistical Sampling in FCA Case

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently declined to rule on the validity of statistical sampling as a method to establish liability and damages in a False Claims Act (FCA) whistleblower case that was closely watched within the FCA bar, U.S. ex rel. Michaels v. Agape Senior Community, Inc. et al. (Nos. 15-2145, 15-2147). In a victory for the government, however, the Court did hold that the FCA grants the Department of Justice (DOJ) an “unreviewable veto” over proposed settlements of FCA cases – even cases in …

DOJ Announces $23 Million in Settlements Related to Implantation of ICD Cardiac Devices

On February 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced settlements with 51 hospitals related to implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), totaling over $23 million.  Combined with previously announced settlements, the DOJ has now reached agreements with more than 500 hospitals totaling more than $280 million relating to ICDs.   According to the DOJ, most of the 51 settling defendants were named in a False Claims Act qui tam lawsuit filed by a health care reimbursement consultant and a cardiac nurse.  U.S. ex rel. Ford et al. v. Abbott Northwestern

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